porkchop

canisantiquus:

Don’t take your dog out in the afternoon heat during summer!
    Not unless you’re going to the river or beach, or a nice cool shady spot. Humans are very efficient at staying cool, using our whole bodies as radiators. Dogs not so much. Their coats will protect them from sunburn, but not sunstroke!

Ways to avoid heat stress in the summer:

  • Wear a light jacket when you walk your dog- this will allow you to better judge when enough is enough by feeling the heat yourself.
  • Walk before lunch or after dinner, when the sun is not its strongest.
  • Set up a kids pool or sprinkler so your dog can wade and chase the water.
  • Wrap a wet bandanna around your dog’s neck
  • Buy a light heat-reflecting vest for black dogs
  • Shave your dog’s underside so it can passively shed heat.
  • Have your dog’s undercoat removed - this is usually an arduous and tedious task, so you may want to pay a groomer to do it.
  • Freeze plain yogurt or broth for a cooling treat

Be especially wary of heat stroke for short-faced, cobby, and heavy-coated dogs!

Symptoms include: 
rapid abdominal contraction, excessive panting, flushed tongue, thick saliva, high heartrate, unsettledness, high internal temperature.

      If your dog shows signs of heat stroke, cool them down immediately by wetting them, giving water, fanning, making sure the air and water penetrates their coat.

     Even if a dog shows no signs of damage, heat stroke can cause internal/organ damage, so have a checkup with a vet.

(via handsomedogs)

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers Identify Genetic Marker Linked to OCD
A group of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists say they have identified a genetic marker that may be associated with the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose causes and mechanisms are among the least understood among mental illnesses.
The results of the research are published online May 13 by the journal Molecular Psychiatry.
“If this finding is confirmed, it could be useful,” says study leader Gerald Nestadt, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of Johns Hopkins’ Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Program. “We might ultimately be able to identify new drugs that could help people with this often disabling disorder, one for which current medications work only 60 to 70 percent of the time.”
Nestadt and his team conducted what is known as a genome-wide association study, scanning the genomes of more than 1,400 people with OCD and more than 1,000 close relatives of people with the mental disorder. A significant association was identified in OCD patients near a gene called protein tyrosine phosphokinase (PTPRD).
OCD is a condition marked by thoughts and images that chronically intrude in the mind and by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing the associated anxiety. Some of the least disabling forms of the disorder can add an extra hour to the day’s routine, causing distress and interfering with daily life. Some people are so disabled that they can’t leave their homes.
Experts say OCD affects an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the U.S. population, and the World Health Organization has called it one of the more disabling medical conditions worldwide. Antidepressants known as SSRIs work for some people, but not everyone; the same is true of behavioral therapy.
Nestadt says the genome-wide association study findings of a PTRPD-OCD link add to evidence that the genetic region they identified is important. The gene has already been shown in animals to be possibly involved in learning and memory, traits influenced by OCD in humans. Moreover, some cases of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been associated with the gene, and OCD and ADHD have some symptoms in common. He says the gene also works with another gene family, SLITRK, which has also been associated with OCD in animals.
“OCD research has lagged behind other psychiatric disorders in terms of genetics,” Nestadt says. “We hope this interesting finding brings us closer to making better sense of it — and helps us find ways to treat it.”
(Image credit: Jennifer Soo)

neurosciencestuff:

Researchers Identify Genetic Marker Linked to OCD

A group of researchers led by Johns Hopkins scientists say they have identified a genetic marker that may be associated with the development of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), whose causes and mechanisms are among the least understood among mental illnesses.

The results of the research are published online May 13 by the journal Molecular Psychiatry.

“If this finding is confirmed, it could be useful,” says study leader Gerald Nestadt, M.D., M.P.H., a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of Johns Hopkins’ Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Program. “We might ultimately be able to identify new drugs that could help people with this often disabling disorder, one for which current medications work only 60 to 70 percent of the time.”

Nestadt and his team conducted what is known as a genome-wide association study, scanning the genomes of more than 1,400 people with OCD and more than 1,000 close relatives of people with the mental disorder. A significant association was identified in OCD patients near a gene called protein tyrosine phosphokinase (PTPRD).

OCD is a condition marked by thoughts and images that chronically intrude in the mind and by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing the associated anxiety. Some of the least disabling forms of the disorder can add an extra hour to the day’s routine, causing distress and interfering with daily life. Some people are so disabled that they can’t leave their homes.

Experts say OCD affects an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the U.S. population, and the World Health Organization has called it one of the more disabling medical conditions worldwide. Antidepressants known as SSRIs work for some people, but not everyone; the same is true of behavioral therapy.

Nestadt says the genome-wide association study findings of a PTRPD-OCD link add to evidence that the genetic region they identified is important. The gene has already been shown in animals to be possibly involved in learning and memory, traits influenced by OCD in humans. Moreover, some cases of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been associated with the gene, and OCD and ADHD have some symptoms in common. He says the gene also works with another gene family, SLITRK, which has also been associated with OCD in animals.

“OCD research has lagged behind other psychiatric disorders in terms of genetics,” Nestadt says. “We hope this interesting finding brings us closer to making better sense of it — and helps us find ways to treat it.”

(Image credit: Jennifer Soo)

(via somethinglovely)

cavetocanvas:

Pieter Claesz, Still Life with Oysters, 1642
At this time in Dutch history, still lifes were in great demand; they signified a time of growing prosperity and abundance, and required no formal education in order to understand their message. In this example, Claesz beautifully renders the scene by combining imported items with local ones, showing the worldly nature of the Dutch economic climate at this time. The objects pictured are so tactile, it’s almost as if you could reach out and stroke the cool glass of the goblet, or pluck an oyster from the plate.

cavetocanvas:

Pieter Claesz, Still Life with Oysters, 1642

At this time in Dutch history, still lifes were in great demand; they signified a time of growing prosperity and abundance, and required no formal education in order to understand their message. In this example, Claesz beautifully renders the scene by combining imported items with local ones, showing the worldly nature of the Dutch economic climate at this time. The objects pictured are so tactile, it’s almost as if you could reach out and stroke the cool glass of the goblet, or pluck an oyster from the plate.